I was born and raised in Istanbul, Turkey. I received my B.Sc. degree in Electrical and Electronics Engineering at Bogazici University, in Istanbul, Turkey in 2014 (specialization: Electronics) and my M.Sc. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering in 2016 at the University of Maryland, in College Park, MD (specialization: Microelectronics). Currently, I am pursuing my Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech, in Atlanta, GA (specialization: Electronic design and applications/Microsystems). I also have a minor in Biomedical Engineering.

​From 2015 to 2016, I was a research assistant at the Autonomous Vehicle Lab (now Bio-Inspired Perception and Robotics Lab) at the University of Maryland. My advisors were Timothy Horiuchi and Sean Humbert. Armed with a background in bio-inspired sensing, I began my Ph.D. work at Georgia Tech in 2016 at Inan Research Lab with Omer T. Inan. My research focuses on noninvasive sensing and neuromodulation. I develop tools and signal processing algorithms to study noninvasive neuromodulation of stress. 

Mainly, I focus on technologies to treat stress and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by leveraging the relationship between the brain and the heart. The brain and the heart share an active and reciprocal dialogue, continuously modulating each other's function. For individuals who have experienced traumatic events, the reminders of these events affect both the brain and heart due to this intimate relationship, and can later develop into stress-related psychiatric disorders. I work on understanding, identifying, developing, and validating noninvasive sensing and neuromodulation technologies to mitigate the body's stress response. These technologies could help the management of stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders at home and improve the quality of life with low cost. I work on both engineering and clinical aspects by performing noninvasive sensing and algorithm development, machine learning/data analytics, study design, and data collection from human subjects and rodents within the infrastructure of Georgia Tech and Emory School of Medicine.

I continually collaborate with psychiatrists, radiologists, cardiologists, epidemiologists, and fellows at the Emory School of Medicine. These collaborations entail conducting numerous human subjects trials, producing scientific and engineering outcomes that could drive future projects and broaden the impact of my research.

My research has pragmatic applications in psychiatric disorders, mood and performance improvement, cardiovascular disease prevention, diagnosis, and prognosis. Broad application areas are cyber-physical systems (CPS), smart and connected health (SCH), Internet of Things (IoT), and novel therapeutics.